Covid-19 Pandemic : An Awareness Exhibition

Introduction
The World Pandemic Outbreak History
What Is Coronavirus (Covid-19)?
Safety & Control
Data & Insights
Covid-19 : The First Strike
The World Outbreak
Malaysia At War
Open Access Coronavirus Research
Introduction

Covid-19 pandemic will go down in history as one of the biggest medical crises affecting mankind. Every living creature has been affected by it and the devastation to the economic, social relationship, politics, human psychological impact, education transformation, jobs retrenchment etc are yet to come. Until now there are more than 4 millions cases reported around the globe with  a total of more than 300,000 in deaths.

A Tribute To All Frontliners – Thank You!

This happened only in six month since December 2019 where it is first started in the city of Wuhan, China. Alongside the personal tragedies and the pressure on overburdened hospitals or disease control centers, there has been a stark economic toll with the World Trade Organisation warning of the “worst recession of our lifetime". The virus also has traveled around the whole world and confined more than a third of humanity to their homes as there has been a marked lack of international solidarity. Behind the staggering statistics are the human costs of the pandemic, not only from the deaths of friends and family, but the physical effects on those infected and the mental trauma and the fear, which almost everyone faces. The fear that comes from not knowing how this pandemic is going to play out, in terms of the effects on our economic, physical and mental well-being. This is against a backdrop that for many people is an increasingly anxious, unhappy and lonely world. Based on that, this exhibition wish to deliver an accurate information about Covid-19, help everyone to manage their live back in coming days and also a special tribute to all front-liner heroes who gave their life for us.

The World Pandemic Outbreak History

The World Pandemic Outbreak History

Learn the history of influenza corona virus pandemic outbreak since 1889 that occurs throughout the world long before Covid-19.

An influenza pandemic is an epidemic of an influenza virus that spreads on a worldwide scale and infects a large proportion of the world population. In contrast to the regular seasonal epidemics of influenza, these pandemics occur irregularly – there have been five influenza pandemics during the last 140 years. Pandemics can cause high levels of mortality, with the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic being the worst in recorded history; this pandemic was estimated to be responsible for the deaths of 50–100 million people. The most recent, the 2009 flu pandemic, resulted in under a million deaths and is considered relatively mild. Influenza pandemics occur when a new strain of the influenza virus is transmitted to humans from another animal species. Species that are thought to be important in the emergence of new human strains are pigs, chickens and ducks. These novel strains are unaffected by any immunity people may have to older strains of human influenza and can therefore spread extremely rapidly and infect very large numbers of people. Influenza A viruses can occasionally be transmitted from wild birds to other species, causing outbreaks in domestic poultry, and may give rise to human influenza pandemics. (Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Influenza_pandemic)

1889 - 1890

Russian Flu Pandemic : 1889-1890

Originally the “Asiatic Flu” or “Russian Flu” as it was called, this strain was thought to be an outbreak of the Influenza A virus subtype H2N2, though recent discoveries have instead found the cause to be the Influenza A virus subtype H3N8. The first cases were observed in May 1889 in three separate and distant locations, Bukhara in Central Asia (Turkestan), Athabasca in northwestern Canada, and Greenland. Rapid population growth of the 19th century, specifically in urban areas, only helped the flu spread, and before long the outbreak had spread across the globe. Though it was the first true epidemic in the era of bacteriology and much was learned from it. In the end, the 1889-1890 Flu Pandemic claimed the lives of over a million individuals.

1918

Spanish Flu Pandemic : 1918

The 1918 influenza pandemic was the most severe pandemic in recent history. Between 1918 and 1920 a disturbingly deadly outbreak of influenza tore across the globe, infecting over a third of the world’s population and ending the lives of 20 – 50 million people. Of the 500 million people infected in the 1918 pandemic, the mortality rate was estimated at 10% to 20%, with up to 25 million deaths in the first 25 weeks alone. What separated the 1918 flu pandemic from other influenza outbreaks was the victims; where influenza had always previously only killed juveniles and the elderly or already weakened patients, it had begun striking down hardy and completely healthy young adults, while leaving children and those with weaker immune systems still alive.

1957

Asian Flu Pandemic : 1957-1958

In February 1957, a new influenza A (H2N2) virus emerged in East Asia, triggering a pandemic (“Asian Flu”). This H2N2 virus was comprised of three different genes from an H2N2 virus that originated from an avian influenza A virus, including the H2 hemagglutinin and the N2 neuraminidase genes. It was first reported in Singapore in February 1957, Hong Kong in April 1957, and in coastal cities in the United States in summer 1957. The estimated number of deaths was 1.1 million worldwide and 116,000 in the United States.

1968

Hong Kong Flu Pandemic : 1968

A category 2 Flu pandemic sometimes referred to as “the Hong Kong Flu,” the 1968 flu pandemic was caused by the H3N2 strain of the Influenza A virus, a genetic offshoot of the H2N2 subtype. From the first reported case on July 13, 1968 in Hong Kong, it took only 17 days before outbreaks of the virus were reported in Singapore and Vietnam, and within three months had spread to The Philippines, India, Australia, Europe, and the United States. While the 1968 pandemic had a comparatively low mortality rate (.5%) it still resulted in the deaths of more than a million people, including 500,000 residents of Hong Kong, approximately 15% of its population at the time.

2009

H1N1 Swine Flu Pandemic : 2009

The 2009 swine flu pandemic was caused by a new strain of H1N1 that originated in Mexico in the spring of 2009 before spreading to the rest of the world. In one year, the virus infected as many as 1.4 billion people across the globe and killed between 151,700 and 575,400 people, according to the CDC. The 2009 flu pandemic primarily affected children and young adults, and 80% of the deaths were in people younger than 65, the CDC reported. That was unusual, considering that most strains of flu viruses, including those that cause seasonal flu, cause the highest percentage of deaths in people ages 65 and older. But in the case of the swine flu, older people seemed to have already built up enough immunity to the group of viruses that H1N1 belongs to, so weren't affected as much. A vaccine for the H1N1 virus that caused the swine flu is now included in the annual flu vaccine

2019

Corona Virus Pandemic (Covid-19) : 2019

Beginning in December 2019, in the region of Wuhan, China, a new (“novel”) coronavirus began appearing in human beings. It has been named Covid-19, a shortened form of “coronavirus disease of 2019.” This new virus spreads incredibly quickly between people, due to its newness – no one on earth has an immunity to Covid-19, because no one had Covid-19 until 2019. While it was initially seen to be an epidemic in China, the virus spread worldwide within months. The WHO declared Covid-19 a pandemic in March, and by the end of that month, the world saw more than a half-million people infected and nearly 30,000 deaths. The infection rate in the US and other nations was still spiking.

Spanish Flu: a Warning From History

Top 10 Worst Epidemics in History

What Is Coronavirus (Covid-19)?

What is Corona Virus (Covid-19) ?

The concept of knowing your enemy first is the best way to obtain a better understanding on Covid-19 natural behavior and how to prevent or protect yourself from getting infected. 

Overview

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory illness and recover without requiring special treatment. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic respiratory disease, and cancer are more likely to develop serious illness. The COVID-19 virus spreads primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes, so it’s important that you also practice respiratory etiquette (for example, by coughing into a flexed elbow). At this time, there are no specific vaccines or treatments for COVID-19. However, there are many ongoing clinical trials evaluating potential treatments.

 

WHO will continue to provide updated information as soon as clinical findings become available.

Symptoms

COVID-19 affects different people in different ways. Most infected people will develop mild to moderate illness and recover without hospitalization.

Most common symptoms:

  • fever, dry cough, tiredness.

Less common symptoms:

  • aches and pains, sore throat, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, headache, loss of taste or smell, a rash on skin or discoloration of fingers or toes.

Serious symptoms:

  • difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, chest pain or pressure, loss of speech or movement.

Seek immediate medical attention if you have serious symptoms.  People with mild symptoms who are otherwise healthy should manage their symptoms at home. On average it takes 5–6 days from when someone is infected with the virus for symptoms to show, however it can take up to 14 days.

Transmission

The virus is transmitted through direct contact with respiratory droplets of an infected person (generated through coughing and sneezing). Individuals can also be infected from touching surfaces contaminated with the virus and touching their face (e.g., eyes, nose, mouth). The COVID-19 virus may survive on surfaces for several hours, but simple disinfectants can kill it. As with other respiratory infections like the flu or the common cold, public health measures are critical to slow the spread of illnesses. Public health measures are everyday preventive actions that include:✓staying home when sick;✓covering mouth and nose with flexed elbow or tissue when coughing or sneezing. Dispose of used tissue immediately;✓washing hands often with soap and water; and✓cleaning frequently touched surfaces and objects. As we learn more about COVID-19 public health officials may recommend additional actions.

At Risk

We are learning more about how COVID-19 affects people every day. Older people, and people with chronic medical conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease, appear to be more at risk of developing severe symptoms. As this is a new virus, we are still learning about how it affects children. We know it is possible for people of any age to be infected with the virus, but so far there are relatively few cases of COVID-19 reported among children. This is a new virus and we need to learn more about how it affects children. The virus can be fatal in rare cases, so far mainly among older people with pre-existing medical conditions. It is important to remember that COVID-19 does not differentiate between borders, ethnicity, disability status, age or gender.

How Contagious?

The transmission rate is relatively high. Early research has estimated that one person who has it can spread it to between 2 and 2.5 others. One study found that the rate was higher, with one case spreading to between 4.7 and 6.6 other people. By comparison, one person who has the seasonal flu will pass it to between 1.1 and 2.3 others.

We can work to lower the transmission rate by washing hands often, keeping common surfaces clean, limiting contact with other people, and wearing cloth face masks when we can’t stay 6 feet away from others.

Treatment

There’s no specific treatment for COVID-19. People who get a mild case need care to ease their symptoms, like rest, fluids, and fever control. Take over-the-counter medicine for a sore throat, body aches, and fever. But don't give aspirin to children or teens younger than 19.You might have heard that you shouldn't take ibuprofen to treat COVID-19 symptoms. But the National Institutes of Health says people who have the virus can use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or acetaminophen as usual.

Antibiotics won’t help because they treat bacteria, not viruses. If you hear about people with COVID-19 getting antibiotics, it’s for an infection that came along with the disease. People with severe symptoms need to be cared for in the hospital. Many clinical trials are under way to explore treatments used for other conditions that could fight COVID-19 and to develop new ones.

What Is Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Recognizing Day to Day Signs and Symptoms of Coronavirus

Safety & Control

Safety & Control

Get a better health strategy and prevention measures on how to protect yourself, family or friends from Covid-19 as suggested by the authorities or official disease control bodies.

Steps to Prevent Illness

  • There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.
  • The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.
    Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
    Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.
  • These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs

Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.

Take steps to protect others

  • Stay home if you’re sick
  • Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. Learn what to do if you are sick.

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others

  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected. For more information about cloth face coverings, including how to make them, click here.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

Clean and disinfect

  • Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
  • If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection

(Source : https://www.mica.edu/campus-operating-status-updates/coronavirus/best-practices-and-preventive-measures/)

Preventing COVID-19 in Your Workplace

Data & Insights

Data & Insights

A reliable data and insights reports on Covid-19 will surely help you to manage your research, study or report on Covid-19 so that an accurate information on the pandemic can help others.

Covid-19 Report : Malaysia

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Other Data Resources

  • Department of Statistic Malaysia - The statistics is based on official data from the Ministry of Health Malaysia and media agencies. All the contents are handpicked, filtered, and curated to the best extent to ensure that sources of information for the public to get real-time updates on the virus’s reach and impact. The statistics are presented using an interactive visualisation or infographic to help the public to grasp the information
  • Our World in Data - A complete COVID-19 dataset is a collection of the COVID-19 data maintained by Our World in Data. It is updated daily and includes data on confirmed cases, deaths, and testing.
  • EU Open Data Portal - The datasets contains the latest available public data on COVID-19 including a daily situation update, the epidemiological curve and the global geographical distribution (EU/EEA and the UK, worldwide).
  • Wolfram Data Repository
  • WHO Global Research - It is the latest international multilingual scientific findings and knowledge on COVID-19 and is updated daily from searches of bibliographic databases, hand searching, and the addition of other expert-referred scientific articles.

Covid-19 Report : Global

Covid-19 : The First Strike

Covid-19 : The First Strike

Learn how the Coronavirus first attack in the bustling city of Wuhan, China and the timeline of preventive or securities measures taken by the Chinese government as the rest of the worlds watching with fear.

The First Covid-19 Cluster

  • The then-mystery illness, Covid-19 was first reported in Wuhan last December, not long before the lead up to the Lunar New Year when China undertakes the world’s largest mass migration. Wuhan is the capital city of Hubei province and is a major travel hub connecting some of the nation’s biggest cities. With a population of 11 million, Wuhan city is larger than London or New York.
  • On 31 December 2019, health authorities in China reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) a cluster of viral pneumonia cases of unknown cause in Wuhan, Hubei and an investigation was launched in early January 2020.
  • On January 27, there were 1,771 new infections in mainland China – the first biggest one-day jump since the outbreak started in December. On the same day, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang arrived in Wuhan to visit patients and hospital staff. Wuhan Municipal Health Commission announced a surge of 15,152 new coronavirus cases, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 32,994 after authorities changed their diagnostic criteria on February 12. The local government has converted a stadium, convention centres and schools into temporary hospitals to now have more than 40 designated clinics for critically or seriously ill patients.
  • On 30 January, the WHO declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)—7,818 cases confirmed globally, affecting 19 countries in five WHO regions. Several of the early cases had visited Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market and so the virus is thought to have a zoophytic origin.
  • The virus that caused the outbreak is known as SARS‑CoV‑2, a newly discovered virus closely related to bat corona viruses, pangolin corona viruses, and SARS-CoV. The scientific consensus is that COVID-19 has a natural origin. The probable bat-to-human infection may have been among people processing bat carcasses and guano in the production of traditional Chinese medicines. The earliest known person with symptoms was later discovered to have fallen ill on 1 December 2019, and that person did not have visible connections with the later wet market cluster. Of the early cluster of cases reported that month, two-thirds were found to have a link with the market.
  • On 13 March 2020, an unverified report from the South China Morning Post suggested a case traced back to 17 November 2019 (a 55-year-old from Hubei) may have been the first person infected.
  • The WHO recognized the spread of COVID-19 as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Italy, Iran, South Korea, and Japan reported surging cases. The total numbers outside China quickly passed China's

Wuhan’s war on COVID-19

  • On 30 January, the WHO declared the outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC)—7,818 cases confirmed globally, affecting 19 countries in five WHO regions. Several of the early cases had visited Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market and so the virus is thought to have a zoophytic origin.
  • The virus that caused the outbreak is known as SARS‑CoV‑2, a newly discovered virus closely related to bat corona viruses, pangolin corona viruses, and SARS-CoV. The scientific consensus is that COVID-19 has a natural origin. The probable bat-to-human infection may have been among people processing bat carcasses and guano in the production of traditional Chinese medicines. The earliest known person with symptoms was later discovered to have fallen ill on 1 December 2019, and that person did not have visible connections with the later wet market cluster. Of the early cluster of cases reported that month, two-thirds were found to have a link with the market.
  • On 13 March 2020, an unverified report from the South China Morning Post suggested a case traced back to 17 November 2019 (a 55-year-old from Hubei) may have been the first person infected.
  • The WHO recognized the spread of COVID-19 as a pandemic on 11 March 2020. Italy, Iran, South Korea, and Japan reported surging cases. The total numbers outside China quickly passed China's

The World Outbreak

The World Outbreak

As the high alert health crisis was declared as Pandemic by WHO, no bodies are exempted from the pandemic outbreak when the disease spread globally in alarming rate and attacked living cities, towns and homes.

The Global Chronological Outbreak

A pneumonia of unknown cause detected in Wuhan, China was first reported to the WHO Country Office in China on 31 December 2019. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on 30 January 2020. On 11 February 2020, WHO announced a name for the new coronavirus disease: COVID-19. In a long-anticipated move, the WHO on March 11 finally declared on the coronavirus outbreak as a pandemic.

December 2019 - February 2020

On December 31, 2019 China alerted the WHO to several cases of unusual pneumonia in Wuhan, a city of 11 million people. The virus was unknown. Several of those infected worked at the city's Huanan Seafood Wholesale Market, which was shut down on January 1. As health experts worked to identify the virus amid growing alarm, the number of infections exceeded 40. On January 5, Chinese officials ruled out the possibility that this was a recurrence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) virus - an illness that originated in China and killed more than 770 people worldwide in 2002-2003.

January 6 - 12, 2020

On January 7, officials announced they had identified a new virus, according to the WHO. The novel virus was named 2019-nCoV and was identified as belonging to the coronavirus family, which includes SARS and the common cold. On January 11, China announced its first death from the virus, a 61-year-old man who had purchased goods from the seafood market. Treatment did not improve his symptoms after he was admitted to hospital and he died of heart failure on the evening of January 9, 2020.

The WHO reported on January 13 a case in Thailand, the first outside of China, in a woman who had arrived from Wuhan. On January 17, as a second death was reported in Wuhan, health authorities in the US announced that three airports would start screening passengers arriving from the city. Authorities in the US, Nepal, France, Australia, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Vietnam and Taiwan confirmed cases over the following days

On January 20, China reported a third death and more than 200 infections, with cases also reported outside Hubei province including in Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. Meanwhile, a Chinese expert on infectious diseases confirmed human-to-human transmission to state broadcaster CCTV, raising fears of a major outbreak as millions travelled for the Lunar New Year holiday. The cities of Wuhan, Xiantao and Chibi in Hubei province were placed under effective quarantine on January 23 as air and rail departures were suspended. By the end of the week, more areas were placed under lockdown affecting a total of 56 million people. The WHO said that the outbreak did not yet constitute a public emergency of international concern and there was "no evidence" of the virus spreading between humans outside of China.

On January 30, the WHO declared the coronavirus a global emergency as the death toll in China jumped to 170, with 7,711 cases reported in the country, where the virus had spread to all 31 provinces. By the end of the week, China reported 304 deaths amid 14,380 infections.  Within a few days, new cases were confirmed in India, Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, Singapore, the US, the UAE and Vietnam. On February 2, the Philippines reported the first death outside China, the victim being a Chinese man from Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province where the new coronavirus was detected in late 2019.

February - March 2020

February 3 - 9, 2020

On February 6, authorities in Malaysia reported the country's first known human-to-human transmission while the number of people infected in Europe reached 30. On February 7, Li Wenliang, a doctor who was among the first to sound the alarm over the coronavirus in China, died, and Hong Kong introduced prison sentences for anyone breaching quarantine rules. On February 9, the death toll in China surpassed that of the 2002-03 SARS epidemic, with 811 deaths recorded and 37,198 infections. An investigative team led by experts from the WHO departed for China.

As of February 10, China had 908 confirmed deaths and a total of 40,171 infections, prompting President Xi Jinping to appear in public for the first time since the outbreak began, visiting a hospital in the capital, Beijing, and urging confidence in the battle against the virus. Five days later, a February 3 speech by Chinese President Xi Jinping, published by state media, indicated the government knew about the threat of the virus well before the public alarm was raised. On February 11, the WHO announced that the disease caused by new coronavirus would be called "COVID-19". The new coronavirus itself was dubbed SARS-CoV-2. On February 13, Japan confirmed its first death linked to the virus. Egypt became the first country in Africa on February 14, to report a case and France reported Europe's first death from the virus. On February 16, Taiwan reported its first death.

On February 19, Iran reported two deaths from the coronavirus, hours after confirming its first cases, while South Korea reported on February 20 its first death from the coronavirus. Meanwhile, China said the death toll had risen to 2,118 while the total number of cases reached 74,576. The country's health commission reported daily infections dropped to the lowest in almost a month, a result of authorities only counting cases confirmed by genetic testing in Hubei. On February 21, Israel reported its first confirmed case after a woman who returned from a cruise ship tested positive. In Italy, officials confirmed a third death on February 23, while local authorities brought the Venice Carnival to an early close and suspended sports events.

This week marked the confirmation of first cases in countries across the world, including Kuwait, Bahrain, Iraq, Oman, Qatar, Norway, Romania, Greece, Georgia, Pakistan, Afghanistan, North Macedonia, Brazil, Estonia, Denmark, Northern Ireland and the Netherlands, Lithuania and Wales. On February 25, Iran's Deputy Health Minister Iraj Harirchi, who, a day earlier, had given a press briefing on the outbreak, confirmed he had coronavirus. The country's official total reached 95 cases with 15 deaths. As the number of infections passed 82,000 worldwide on February 27, including more than 2,800 deaths, the US was considering invoking the Defense Production Act which would grant President Donald Trump the power to expand industrial production of key materials or products for national security.

On March 5, Saudi Arabia announced its first coronavirus case. China's Health Commission reported 99 new cases on March 7, down from 143 cases the day before, with a total of 80,651 cases nationwide. Official data showed the country's exports plunging 17.2 percent in the first two months of the year after the outbreak brought much of the country to a halt. On Monday 8, Saudi authorities locked down the eastern Qatif region and announced the suspension of all schools and universities across the country until further notice. In a sweeping move, Italy imposed a strict quarantine in the state of Lombardy and 14 other areas in the north, affecting a total of 16 million people.

March - April 2020

March 9 - 15, 2020

On March 9, Iran released said some 70,000 prisoners had been released because of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, without specifying if or when those freed would need to return to jail. On March 10, Lebanon and Morocco reported their first deaths from the virus. In a long-anticipated move, the WHO on March 11 declared on the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, while Turkey, Ivory Coast, Honduras, Bolivia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Panama and Mongolia confirmed their first cases. In Qatar, infections jumped drastically from 24 to 262 in a single day.  On March 15, Kazakhstan, the Philippines and Austria tightened restrictions in a bid to contain the pandemic.

On March 18, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison declared, for the first time ever, a "human biosecurity emergency" in the country. On the other side of the Pacific ocean, Chile and Guatemala shut down their borders hoping strict measures would curb the spread of the virus. But in rare positive news, no new domestic cases were reported in China for the first time since the start of the outbreak. On March 20, coronavirus-related deaths surged past 10,000 globally. More cases were reported in Turkey and Pakistan, while Iran registered a total of 14,991 infections and 853 deaths. On March 21, as Europe remained the epicentre of the pandemic, with Italy reporting 4,825 fatalities amid 53,578 cases, the EU took the unprecedented step to suspend rules on public deficits, giving countries free rein to inject spending into the economy as needed. On March 22, Palestinian officials in the besieged Gaza Strip announced the first two coronavirus cases.

In the US, the White House and Senate leaders of both parties struck an agreement on March 25 on a sweeping $2 trillion measure to aid workers, businesses and a healthcare system strained by pandemic. By the end of the week, the US accounted for the highest number of coronavirus infections in the world, recording more than 124,000 cases and 2,000 deaths, more than double the figure two days before. Meanwhile, as the number of cases worldwide surpassed 600,000, with more than 27,000 deaths on March 27, India and South Africa joined the countries to impose lockdowns. Kenya, Kazakhstan and Honduras reported their first deaths, while Johnson announced he had tested positive. In Europe, Spain recorded 838 new coronavirus deaths over the previous 24 hours on March 29, marking the country's highest daily jump in fatalities. The country was now second only to Italy where the death toll shot past 10,000 with 889 new deaths.

On March 31, the number of deaths due to coronavirus in the US surpassed those reported by China, where the new coronavirus was detected late last year. By the end of the week, the US reported more than 4,000 amid more than 300,000 cases. On April 1, UN chief Antonio Guterres warned the coronavirus pandemic presents the world with its "worst crisis" since World War II as the global total of confirmed COVID-19 cases reached one million and the worldwide death toll topped 50,000. On April 3, the World Health Organization (WHO) warned governments in the Middle East that they must act quickly to limit the spread of the coronavirus as cases in the region have risen to nearly 60,000 - almost double the tally of a week earlier. In the United Kingdom, Johnson was taken to a hospital on April 5 after showing persistent symptoms, 10 days after testing positive for the virus. On the same day, Iran, the worst-hit country in the Middle East, reported a total death toll of 3,603 amid 58,226 cases. However, President Hassan Rouhani said that "low-risk" economic activities would resume from April 11.

On April 6, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson was moved into intensive care as his condition worsened after being hospitalised in London with persistent COVID-19 symptoms. He was released from intensive care on April 9 and was discharged from hospital on April 12. On April 7, Japan declared a state of emergency amid a spike in coronavirus cases, while Singapore began a partial lockdown. On April 8, Wuhan began allowing people to leave for the first time since the central Chinese city was sealed off 76 days ago to contain the coronavirus that first emerged there late last year. In Singapore, the use of Zoom for online education was suspended after hackers hijacked a lesson and showed obscene images to students. The UK announced its worst single-day death toll on April 10, with a further 980 people who had contracted coronavirus losing their lives in the 24 hours before Thursday evening. The US recorded on April 11 a total death toll of 20,071, surpassing Italy's toll of 19,468. Cases in the US topped 519,000.

April - May 2020

On April 14, both India and France extended a nationwide lockdown, until May 3 and May 11, respectively. On the same day, Taiwan reported no new cases for the first time in more than a month. Meanwhile, as known infections worldwide surpassed two million on April 15, the International Monetary Fund said the global economy was expected to shrink by three percent this year - the biggest contraction since the Great Depression of the 1930s. On April 17, Saudi Arabia's grand mufti said prayers during Ramadan and the subsequent Eid al-Fitr festival should be performed at home if the coronavirus outbreak continues, according to a Saudi newspaper. Turkey surpassed Iran for the most infections in the Middle East on April 19, as cases there rose to 86,306.

On April 21, President Donald Trump announced on Twitter that he "will be signing an Executive Order to temporarily suspend immigration into the United States!" Meanwhile, a report by the UN World Food Programme warned that the number of people facing acute food insecurity could double, jumping to 265 million, because of the disruptions caused by the pandemic, including border closures. The pandemic is expected to drive carbon dioxide emissions down by six percent this year, the head of the World Meteorological Organization said on April 22, in what would be the biggest yearly drop since World War II. On April 23, the number of US citizens who filed for first-time unemployment benefits in the five weeks since the start of coronavirus-related lockdowns reached a record 26 million. The confirmed number of coronavirus-related deaths worldwide on April 25 reached another grim milestone by exceeding the 200,000 threshold. On the same day, the WHO warned against countries issuing so-called "immunity passports" to those who have recovered from COVID-19, saying there was no scientific evidence to prove that these people develop immunity against potential infection in the future. On April 26, the Chinese city of Wuhan, where the global coronavirus pandemic began, said it had no remaining cases of the infection in its hospitals, with all patients treated for COVID-19 discharged. Saudi Arabia partially lifted the curfew in all regions of the kingdom while keeping a 24-hour curfew in Mecca and previously isolated neighborhoods.

The number of US cases surpassed on April 28 one million, a third of global infections, while the death toll exceeded 57,000. On April 29, Gilead Sciences' remdesivir proved effective against the new coronavirus in a major study, shortening the time it takes for patients to recover by four days on average, according to US government and company officials. The news came as the US economy took its hardest hit since the height of the Great Recession, with its GDP contracting 4.8 percent in the first quarter of the year. More than 30 million people in the US filed claims on April 30 for jobless benefits since the beginning of coronavirus-related lockdowns. Meanwhile, the eurozone's economy shrunk by 3.8 percent in the first quarter, the biggest hit since records began in 1995. On May 3, Afghanistan's health ministry raised the alarm over the spread of the new coronavirus after a small study with random tests in Kabul suggested that about a third of the capital's residents could be infected.

May 4 - 10 , 2020

On May 5, the United Kingdom recorded the highest official COVID-19 death toll in Europe, with more than 30,000 people dead. In a reversal from earlier statements, US President Donald Trump said on May 7 that the emergency task force handling his administration's response to the coronavirus outbreak will not be wound down, and will instead continue its work "indefinitely". The WHO warned on May 8, that 83,000 to 190,000 people in Africa could be killed by the coronavirus disease in the first year and infect between 29 million and 44 million during that period if it is not contained. On May 10, both China and South Korea reported new spikes in coronavirus cases, with Seoul recording 34 new cases - its biggest single-day jump in about a month.

Saudi Arabia said on May 11 it will impose tough austerity measures by tripling its Value Added Tax from 5 percent to 15 percent, in addition to halting monthly handout payments to citizens in order to cope with record low oil prices and a coronavirus-led economic slump. On May 14, The United Nations predicted the coronavirus pandemic will shrink the world economy by 3.2 percent this year, the sharpest contraction since the Great Depression in the 1930s, pushing an estimated 34.3 million people into extreme poverty, mostly in Africa. Officials confirmed on May 15 the first coronavirus infection of a Rohingya refugee in the sprawling camps in southern Bangladesh. On May 16, India coronavirus cases surpassed China's with the health ministry reporting 85,940 infections and 2,752 deaths. The worst-hit Indian states are Maharashtra with 29,100 cases, Tamil Nadu 10,108, Gujarat 9,931 and New Delhi 8,895. Former US President Barack Obama criticised the country’s leaders on May 17 for their handling of the coronavirus response, telling college graduates in an online commencement address that the pandemic shows many officials "aren't even pretending to be in charge". India extended a nearly two-month-old stringent lockdown by another two weeks.

On May 18, World leaders have spoken at the virtual meeting of the World Health Assembly, as many countries have called for an independent probe into the pandemic. Spain has reported a daily death toll below 100 for the first time in two months, while Italy's has been the lowest since the start of its lockdown. India however, has recorded its biggest single-day surge with 5,242 new cases of coronavirus and 157 deaths in the last 24 hours, taking the country's infection tally to more than 96,000 - the most in Asia.

(Source : https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/01/timeline-china-coronavirus-spread-200126061554884.html)

Malaysia At War

Malaysia At War

With a total of infected persons rising every day, Malaysian government and its people determine to fight back in order to prevent further spreading of the virus and claim their live back at all cost.

Early Cases

The Ministry of Health (MOH) through the National Crisis Preparedness and Response Centre (CPRC) receives three reports (two in Sabah and one Selangor) suspected to be infected with 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). MOH confirms cases in Sabah were 2019-nCoV negative. MOH informed that eight close contacts linked to first 2019-nCoV case in Singapore are in Johor Bahru and are quarantined. Health Minister Datuk Seri Dr Dzulkefly Ahmad confirms first 2019-nCoV case involves three Chinese citizens who had entered Malaysia via Johor from Singapore on Jan 23, 2020. On Jan 30, MOH confirms another positive case among close contacts (eighth case), cumulative total increased to eight cases. A total of 74 people identified through contact tracing following the first Malaysian case of COVID-19, out of which 35 close contacts are traced and samples taken from them and placed under monitoring and surveillance order.

The Preparation

MOH identifies 26 hospitals nationwide as a preparatory measure to handle cases of suspected 2019-nCoV infections that require further examination and treatment. The government decides to temporarily suspend all immigration facilities to Chinese citizens coming from Wuhan city and Hubei province with immediate effect. Yang di-Pertuan Agong Al-Sultan Abdullah Ri´ayatuddin Al-Mustafa Billah Shah instructs mosques nationwide to perform hajat prayer. The Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture (MOTAC) establishes the Tourism Recovery Committee to monitor 2019-nCoV current developments. The Sabah state government decides to temporarily suspend all scheduled and chartered flights from China to Sabah with immediate effect until further notice. On Feb 27, interim Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad announces the 2020 Economic Stimulus Package in a bid to boost the economy following the effects of the virus outbreak.

Bringing Back Our Malaysians

Prime Minister Tun Dr Mahathir says Malaysia preparing to bring back citizens from Wuhan, China. A special humanitarian mission to bring Malaysians back from Hubei province is activated following the coronavirus outbreak in the region. The committee is coordinated by the National Disaster Management Agency (Nadma) in collaboration with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry of Health, the Malaysian Armed Forces and the National Security Council. Malaysia brings home 107 individuals comprising Malaysians and their families stranded in Wuhan city, which has been locked down by the Chinese government since Jan 23, following the outbreak since Jan 23. Unfortunately two out of 107 individuals, who returned to Malaysia through the mission are confirmed COVID-19 positive, bringing the cumulative number of positive cases in Malaysia to 12.

The Outbreak Cluster

The 131st case earlier reported as sporadic is found not to be one after further investigation by the MOH finds that the patient was one of the Tabligh religious gatherings at the Sri Petaling mosque from Feb 27-March 1. A total 41 new COVID-19 cases are reported on March 14, taking the tally up to 238 cases. All the new cases are linked to the tabligh religious gathering cluster, comprising 37 PUI cases and four more from close contacts. A staggering 190 positive COVID-19 cases are reported the next day, with the tally now at 428 cases. Preliminary investigations show that the majority of the cases are linked to the Sri Petaling mosque tabligh religious gathering cluster. A total 125 positive COVID-19 cases are reported, with the nationwide tally now up to 553 cases on 16 March. 95 of these 125 new cases are linked to the Sri Petaling mosque tabligh religious gathering cluster.

Movement Control Order

As jumps in cases began to occur in early March, the Yang di-Pertuan Agong expressed great concern over the escalation of the outbreak. Measures to combat the outbreak were later announced by the Prime Minister of Malaysia via live nationwide telecast on 13 March 2020 as a nationwide "Movement Control Order" (MCO), intended to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 through social distancing, was announced to last between 18 and 31 March. The Attorney-General's Chambers (AGC) also published a federal gazette on 18 March 2020 that restricts individuals from travelling to other states that have been declared as coronavirus-affected areas. On 25 March, the MCO was extended by an addition two weeks, until 14 April, as the rate of new cases per day remained consistently high. Subsequently, the MCO was announced to be extended until 28 April on 10 April and extended again to 12 May on 23 April. A plan to ease the lockdown by allowing businesses to open on 4 May was announced on 1 May.

Vaccine Research

In mid-March, the Malaysian Vaccines and Pharmaceuticals (MVP) reportedly has pleaded for co-operation and support from the federal government, with its executive director claimed their company has faced multiple postponed meetings in an attempt to meet the health minister to request for a sample from the Institute of Medical Research (IMR) of Malaysia. By 25 March, the IMR has set to begin testing existing local vaccines in collaboration with the MVP and Universiti Malaya Tropical Infectious Diseases Research and Education Centre (TIDREC). The local vaccines testing will be conducted in UM's TIDREC laboratory, which is one of Malaysia's modular biosafety level 3 (BSL3) facilities previously used to study highly pathogenic agents such as MERS coronavirus and Nipah virus with the vaccines to be firstly tested on the infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), which is an avian coronavirus, as previous research shows that the IBV in poultry has high genetic similarity with the human coronavirus.

Economic Stimulus Plan

As stocks on Malaysia's stock exchange of Bursa Malaysia tumbled during the outbreak as investors sold securities due to the expected economic impact caused by the virus, which along with other emerging stock markets are predicted to remain until June 2020. With China as Malaysia's largest trading partner, the country's economy was directly impacted and economic experts have warned the prolonged virus outbreak could hit the country gross domestic product (GDP) hard. Based on the critical situation, an allocation of RM130 million has been announced and will be distributed equally to all states to help overcome the Covid-19 pandemic. Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin launched a special stimulus plan on 6 April, worth RM10 billion aimed at small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) to mitigate the impact of action control orders (MCO). The Prime Minister said that SMEs and micro-enterprises accounted for two-thirds of the country's manpower and contributed 40% of the country's economy. This is in addition to other economic stimulus plans that increase cash flow to ensure that the economy will not collapse. On 27 March, Prime Minister Muhyiddin launched the federal government's RM250 billion Prihatin stimulus package to help people, businesses and the economy to weather the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic. The stimulus package consists of RM128 billion for welfare assistance, RM100 billion to support small and medium businesses, RM2 billion to strengthen the country's economy, and a RM20 billion stimulus package that was previously announced by the government.

Aid From Friends

The Malaysians were given aid from the United Arab Emirates, which included 600,000 face masks, 200 ventilators, about 100,000 test kits and 50,000 protective clothings.  Neighbouring Singapore had donated 5,000 universal transport medium (UTM) swabs, a critical component in test kits which can test for a case of the virus within minutes. Malaysia also among the seven countries in Taiwan further aid lists following the former request of face masks supplies, with Taiwan has began to starting its second round of surgical mask donations to severely hit countries in Latin America and Southeast Asia from 9 April after its donations to Europe and the United States been fulfilled.  Taiwanese Tzu Chi foundation also donating essential food and equipment to hospitals and clinics in Malaysia. Turkey-based Independent Industrialists' and Businessmen's Association's (MUSIAD) had distribute free face masks to shoppers at a mall in Malaysia's capital of Kuala Lumpur on 11 April to assist the country efforts in their fight against the virus.Macdonald's Malaysia which is part of an American fast-food franchise donated food to about 50 hospitals in the country, to reach 15,000 healthcare workers, and also to other frontliners such as the police and army personnel.

Relaxation of Restrictions

As the number of daily cases and active cases of COVID-19 reduced in Malaysia by mid-April, the government had relaxed several measures of the MCO. On 1 May, the Malaysian Government announced that it will be relaxing Movement Control Order restrictions from 4 May as part of its plan to gradually restart the country's economy. Transport Minister Dr Wee Ka Siong confirmed that all public transportation services would resume on 4 May. As part of the fourth phase of the Movement Control Order, two family members will be allowed to buy food and other daily essentials. The easing of MCO drew criticisms from politicians and healthcare experts over concerns that it was too much too soon and by 3 May, over 420,000 members of the public had signed a petition objecting to the conditional MCO and calling for the government to stay with the MCO. Despite that, the existing Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO) enforced nationwide has been extended to June 9 as the Malaysian Prime Minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin announced on Sunday, May 10. In his special address on the 7th day of the CMCO, Mr Muhyiddin said despite achieving several positive results throughout the movement control order imposed since March 18, measures must be taken to continue the fight against the pandemic.

Open Access Coronavirus Research

Open Access Corona Virus Research

Browse the latest articles, research development and accurate information from reliable resources on Corona Virus (Covid-19).

Open Access Coronavirus Research

List of Article and Research

(Links provided by Ms Nurul Elina binti Md Rosli Shanarat, UiTM Rembau Practical Trainee)

Others

Open Access Coronavirus Links

Introduction

Symtom and Preventive Measure

Covid-19 Chronology in Malaysia

Current Statistic of Malaysia

Video List

Local News Paper List

Infographic

Social Media

  • Kementerian Kesihatan Malaysia / Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH)

@KKMPutrajaya - https://twitter.com/KKMPutrajaya?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor

@kementeriankesihatanmalaysia - https://www.facebook.com/kementeriankesihatanmalaysia/

@kementeriankesihatanmalaysia - https://www.instagram.com/kementeriankesihatanmalaysia/?hl=en

(Links provided by Ms Nurul Elina binti Md Rosli Shanarat, UiTM Rembau Practical Trainee)

Covid-19 pandemic will go down in history as one of the biggest medical crises affecting mankind. Every living creature has been affected by it and the devastation to the economic, social relationship, politics, human psychological impact, education transformation, jobs retrenchment etc are yet to come. Until now there are more than 4 millions cases reported around the globe with  a total of more than 300,000 in deaths.

A Tribute To All Frontliners – Thank You!

This happened only in six month since December 2019 where it is first started in the city of Wuhan, China. Alongside the personal tragedies and the pressure on overburdened hospitals or disease control centers, there has been a stark economic toll with the World Trade Organisation warning of the “worst recession of our lifetime". The virus also has traveled around the whole world and confined more than a third of humanity to their homes as there has been a marked lack of international solidarity. Behind the staggering statistics are the human costs of the pandemic, not only from the deaths of friends and family, but the physical effects on those infected and the mental trauma and the fear, which almost everyone faces. The fear that comes from not knowing how this pandemic is going to play out, in terms of the effects on our economic, physical and mental well-being. This is against a backdrop that for many people is an increasingly anxious, unhappy and lonely world. Based on that, this exhibition wish to deliver an accurate information about Covid-19, help everyone to manage their live back in coming days and also a special tribute to all front-liner heroes who gave their life for us.

Current Global Statistic

GET YOUR FACTS RIGHT ON COVID-19

Know the facts about coronavirus disease and help stop the spread of rumors

World Health Organization (WHO)

World Health Organization (WHO)

World Health Organization (WHO) is an official United Nation health organization that organized and managed the Covid-19 pandemic issues. Visit WHO.

Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH)

Malaysia Ministry of Health (MOH) is a government body that supervise and assist the nation on Covid-19 pandemic outbreak in Malaysia. Visit MOH.

Malaysia Official News Agency (Bernama)

Bernama is Malaysian News Agency that serve official news on Covid-19 pandemic especially on government initiatives or activities. Visit Bernama.

DONATE

MERCY Malaysia's providing humanitarian assistance to affected parties until December 2020. Your donation will help them reach out to those in need in these challenging period.

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SHARE & CARE

Share our online exhibition with others so that we can spread the reliable and accurate information on Covid-19. Be our netizen front-liners and fight the false information.

SUPPORT

If you or your family need support during this difficult period, do not hesitate to approach reliable support group or personnel. Or help those in needs by any means or resources.

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The Covid-19 Awareness Exhibition was produced by User Experience Service Unit, PSB UUM as part of Online Exhibition series.